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Turkey Vulture
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At Santa Teresa County Park, San Jose, California, US
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Clade: Telluraves
Clade: Afroaves
Superorder: Accipitrimorphae
Order: Cathartiformes
Family: Cathartidae
Genus: Cathartes
Species: C. aura
Binomial name
Cathartes aura
Linnaeus, 1758
Turkeyvulturerange
Range of C. aura      Summer only range     Winter only range
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The Turkey Vulture, Cathartes aura, is one of three species in the genus Cathartes, in the family Cathartidae.[2]


Click for other names

Description

The Turkey Vulture is 60–80 cm (24–31 in) and a 6-foot wingspan;[3][4] it weighs 1.6–2.4 kg (3.5–5.3 lb).[5]

Large, nearly eagle-sized bird,[6] with obvious red[7] head and legs,[3] which can be seen at close range.[6] In flight, the wings appear two-toned;[3][6][8][9][10][7] as flight feathers are lighter than wing linings.[6] The tips of wings end in finger-like projects.[3] Long squared tail.[3] Ivory bill.[3]

Similar species

Behaviour

Diet

Calls

Generally quiet, but will let out a hiss or grunt if it feels threatened or cornered.[11][6][12]

Reproduction

Distribution/habitat

It ranges from southern Canada to the southernmost tip of South America.

It inhabits a variety of open and semi-open areas, including subtropical forests, shrublands, pastures, and deserts[1] as well as shorelines and roads.[11]

References

  1. ^ a b BirdLife International (2013). "Cathartes aura". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013. 
  2. ^ John H. Boyd III (January 26, 2012). "ACCIPITRIMORPHAE: Cathartiformes, Accipitriformes". TiF Checklist. Retrieved 23-07-2017.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d e f Tekiela, Stan (2002). Birds of Oklahoma Field Guide. Adventure Publicatins, Inc. ISBN 1885061331. 
  4. ^ Reader's Digest Editors (1982). Reader's Digest North American Wildlife. Reader's Digest Association. ISBN 0895771020. 
  5. ^ Clark, William S.; Brian K. Wheeler (2011). Hawks of North America, 2nd Edition. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 12. ISBN 0395670675.  Cite uses deprecated parameter |coauthors= (help);
  6. ^ a b c d e Peterson, Roger Tory (1961). A Field Guide to Western Birds. Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 039513692X. 
  7. ^ a b Garrigues, Richard and Dean, Robert (2007). The Birds of Costa Rica. Zona Tropical Publication. ISBN 9780801473739. 
  8. ^ Peterson, Roger Tory (1980). A Field Guide to the Birds East of the Rockies. Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 039526619X. 
  9. ^ Robbins, Chandler S.; Bertel Bruun, Herbet S. Zim and Arthur Singer (illu.) (1983). A Guide to Field Indentification: Birds of North America. Western Publishing Company. ISBN 0307336565. 
  10. ^ Peterson, Roger Tory (2012). Peterson Field Guide to Birds of Arizona. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. ASIN B0090R20OI. 
  11. ^ a b Krista Kagume (2005). Compact Guide to Ontario Birds. Lone Pine Publishing. ISBN 1551054671. 
  12. ^ Houston, D., Kirwan, G.M., Christie, D.A. & Marks, J.S. (2016). Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. (retrieved from http://www.hbw.com/node/52940 on 2 February 2016).

External links

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